Are you looking for new eyeglasses?

At your Killeen Vision Source, TX, we have a fully trained team of opticians dedicated to assisting you in making tough eyewear decisions. With all of the options available for your eyeglasses, making the right choices for your vision needs can be daunting. We can help you choose between the various frame materials, designers, and different types of lenses. We have something for everyone – visit us today!

New clients and all our current patients are welcome to visit us with their current prescription – no appointment necessary.

Nonprescription Sunglasses

Everyone should have a good pair of sunglasses. Whether you wear prescription eyeglasses or not, sunglasses are important for every age, race and gender. While sunglasses may be considered a must-have fashion accessory, even more importantly, they play a critical role in protecting your eyes from UV (ultraviolet) and other harmful radiation from the sun. They also shield your eyes from wind, dust and debris that could cause discomfort, dryness or damage.

Sunglasses should be worn in the winter as well as the summer and should be 100% UV blocking. This doesn’t mean that you have to pay a fortune for your shades. Even cheaper brands of sunglasses are made these days with full UV protection, so take the extra time to ensure you select ones that do offer full protection from the sun’s rays.

Frame Materials

Sunglass frames are made in a wide variety of materials from plastics and acetates, to wood and natural materials to metals, such as aluminum, steel or titanium. Before you select a pair of frames, think about your lifestyle and what type of material will be most suitable for you. If you live an active lifestyle, sturdy and durable frames are a must. If you have sensitive skin, look for a pair made with hypoallergenic material that is light and fits comfortably. Make sure you select a pair that fits well, looks good and properly blocks the sun to ensure that you feel confident and comfortable when you are wearing them.

Sunglasses Shapes

Sunglasses serve as a combination of function and fashion and therefore come in a plethora of shapes and styles. Sunglasses are often larger than eyeglasses to cover more surface area and prevent sunlight from entering around the lenses. While fashion sunglasses are made in all of the latest styles from aviator to cat eyes, round, square and oversized, sports sunglasses are generally more durable and broad, often in

wraparound styles that prevent sunlight from entering from the sides as well. Wrap-around frames are a good option for athletes, fishermen and bikers that spend a lot of time outdoors in the sun.

Lenses

Lenses are the most important part of any pair of sunglasses. As mentioned above, all lenses should block 100% UV rays but beyond that there are many options for sunglass lenses. Polycarbonate or trivex lenses are impact-resistant to increase safety during sports and outdoor activities. Polarized lenses help to reduce glare and are particularly helpful during activities on or near the water such as boating, fishing or beaching. Anti-glare and anti-scratch coatings are also beneficial to maintain your best vision in a variety of conditions.

For the fashion conscious there are a number of colors and reflective coatings available for sunglass lenses. It’s best to choose the lenses that allow for the most accurate color vision with the least amount of distortion to ensure they don’t obstruct clear vision.

While it’s important to choose sunglasses that you like from a style and appearance perspective, it’s also important to pay attention to comfort and fit. Here are a few tips for purchasing sunglasses that fit well for maximum comfort and sun protection:

  1. Make sure the lenses completely cover your eyes and provide extra coverage above and to the sides.
  1. The frames shouldn’t pinch at your temples or the nosepiece and should be wide enough for your face.
  1. Ensure that the frames aren’t too wide and stay in place when you move your head around.

Sunglasses for Prescription Eyeglass Users

If you wear prescription eyeglasses there are a number of options for sun protection. These options include prescription sunglasses, photochromic lenses (which turn from clear lenses to dark when you go outside), clip-ons, fitovers (which are sunglasses that go over your prescription eyewear) or wearing contact lenses with plano (non-prescription) sunglasses. Speak to your optician to determine the best option for you.

Prescription Sunglasses

If you currently wear eyeglasses for nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, you should strongly consider purchasing a second pair of glasses: prescription sunglasses.

Why? Because prescription sunglasses are often the best solution when you want clear, comfortable vision outdoors or when you’re driving on a sunny day. They eliminate glare and the need for squinting in bright conditions, which can reduce vision and cause eye strain.

Even if you normally wear contact lenses and nonprescription (plano) sunglasses, there will be times when your contacts dry out or become uncomfortable – especially on the beach, where you battle the

effects of sand, sun, wind and water. Prescription sunglasses enable you to be outdoors all day without these discomfort problems or the hassle of dealing with your contacts.

A better solution for driving

If you normally wear prescription eyeglasses, you face a dilemma when driving on sunny days. You can purchase “clip-on” sunglasses (or a modern magnetic version of them) for your eyeglasses. But these can sometimes scratch your lenses or can be difficult to put on without taking off your glasses – which can be dangerous when driving.

Another solution is to purchase one pair of prescription eyeglasses that have photochromic lenses – the kind that darkens automatically outdoors. The problem here is that these lenses often won’t darken properly inside a vehicle because some of the sun’s UV rays are blocked by your car or truck’s windshield glass.

For convenience and comfort, the best solution for seeing in the sun is prescription sunglasses. For easy access and so you don’t forget them, store them in your car or boat so they’re always there when you need them.

Many lens styles available

Prescription sunglasses are available in a wide variety of lens materials and designs, including high index plastic and progressive (“no-line bifocal”) lenses. For boating, fishing and driving, polarized lenses offer superior glare protection from light reflecting off water and roadways.

If you plan on wearing your prescription sunglasses when playing sports, working with power tools or engaging in other activities that have the potential of causing eye injuries, choose lightweight lenses made of polycarbonate or Trivex. Lenses made of these materials are far more impact-resistant than glass or plastic sunglass lenses.

As with regular prescription eyeglasses, frame styles for prescription sunglasses are nearly unlimited. The only exception is that prescription sunglasses cannot be made in the same severe wraparound styles that some nonprescription sunglasses have. However, models with a lesser-curved wraparound style are available.

Prescription Sunglass Treatments

Prescription sunglasses

If you spend a lot of time outdoors or driving in the car, and still need vision correction, prescription sunglasses are perfect for soothing the eyes. Since most prescription sunglasses manufacturers block 100% UV, prescription sunglasses are a healthy way to enjoy the outdoors (especially the beach) and driving using the darkest lenses available to protect against the brightness of the sun.

Polarized sunglasses

For reduced glare and increased clarity in your vision, a pair of polarized sunglasses can’t be beat. An invisible filter is built into your lenses—making images appear sharper and clearer while reducing the intensity of the sun’s glare. Make sure your polarized sunglasses block 100% UV, and remember that polarized sunglasses are available with or without a prescription.

It’s always handy to have a second pair of eyeglasses—why not choose a second pair that makes a real difference in the comfort and clarity of vision while doing the things you love most!

Prescription Eyeglasses

No matter what your eye condition, or how you choose to view the world, there are now prescription lenses that meet your unique lifestyle and vision correction needs. Eyeglass lenses that change as the light changes, from clear indoors to dark outdoors. Bifocal lenses that provide multiple fields of vision. High-index lenses that are thinner and lighter than ever before. And progressive lenses that eliminate the traditional lines of multi-focal lenses. The point is, while eyeglass lenses are prescribed to correct all kinds of vision problems, prescription lenses have come a long way—offering you the opportunity to truly customize your eyeglasses and make a statement about how you choose to look at the world.

  • Bifocal Lenses

 

Bifocals are lenses with two distinct viewing areas to help correct vision that fails at two or even three distances.

  • High Index and Aspheric Lenses

 

Manufactured to be thinner at the edges of the lens and lighter in weight overall—a good choice for people with stronger prescriptions.

  • Photochromic Lenses

 

Photochromic lenses change from clear to dark based on the intensity of UV radiation.

  • Progressive Lenses

 

Progressive lenses allow multiple vision fields to be incorporated into a single lens without any clear distinction between the fields themselves. This is why progressive lenses are often referred to as “no-line” bifocals or trifocals.

 

  • Consider a Second Pair of Glasses

 

Oftentimes, one pair of eyeglasses simply can’t do it all. Read up and watch a short video about the benefits of owning a second pair!

  • Caring for Lenses

 

These lens care and maintenance tips will go a long way toward maintaining your healthy sight.

Specialty Eyewear

  • Safety and Sports Glasses

Enjoy sports to the fullest, with no worries about eye safety. Learn more about the benefits of protective sports eyewear for you and your kids.

  • Swim Goggles

 

The proper spots eyewear will help you see as clearly in the pool and underwater as you do on dry ground.

  • Shooting Glasses and Hunting Eyewear

 

Good vision is critical when hunting or using a firearm, so look for the right features when buying “shooting glasses.

  • Contacts & Glasses that Enhance Performance

 

Sports eyewear does more than just protect your eyes from injury – it offers performance advantages as well.

Transitions Lenses

Welcome to a near-perfect pair of glasses.

Transitions lenses are photochromic lenses that are clear until dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UV) is present. Once outdoors, the brighter the sun, the darker Transitions lenses become. They turn as dark as sunglasses by automatically reacting to the intensity of UV radiation.

Since Transitions lenses block 100% of the sun’s eye-damaging rays and help to reduce painful, discomforting glare, they protect your eyes on cloudy days, sunny days, and everything in between. Transitions lenses are the most convenient way for you to protect your eyes from the light you can see and the light you can’t. All while helping to improve the quality of your vision and the long-term health and well-being of your eyes.

That means healthy sight for just about everyone, anywhere, anytime!

  • Are Transitions Right For You?

 

Indoors, outdoors, day and night—while working, reading, playing or just kicking back with family or friends, your life is unique. And uniquely busy. In a perfect world, your everyday lenses would help you see better, feel better and look better; all while protecting your eyes day-in and day-out.

  • Original Transitions Lenses

 

Transitions ® everyday lenses can help you through your busy day. This dynamic eyewear is designed to be worn indoors and to automatically adapt when outdoors to give you a more comfortable viewing experience while protecting your eyes from damaging UV light.

  • Transitions XTRActive

 

Features include: Slight indoor tint, darkest everyday Transitions lens for those who spend most of the day outdoors, moderate tint behind the windshield to provide some comfort while driving.

  • Transition SOLFX Sunwear Products

Transitions® SOLFX™ performance sun lenses are specifically designed for outdoor activities to help enhance visual performance. Crafted with functionality in mind, Transitions SOLFX lenses automatically adjust to optimize lens color and darkness in changing outdoor lighting conditions.

  • Transitions Lenses Video

 

See Transitions® Lenses in a whole new light! There are now two distinct families of lenses for the comfort, convenience and UV protection that best fit your lifestyle.

Lens Treatments

A lens treatment is a special additive that either bonds with the lens, or is built into the lens during the lens manufacturing process. Lens treatments are available as individual additions to lenses, and are also commonly bundled into single lens products for convenience and maximum benefit to your eyes.

Common Lens Coatings & Treatments:

  • UV Protection

 

The UV rays in sunlight can be harmful to the eyes. Lenses that block 100% UV help to ward off various eye conditions and damage.

  • Scratch Resistant

 

Scratches on lenses are distracting, plain and simple. And they can interfere with lens performance. Scratch-resistant treatments imbued into the lens surface toughen up the lenses making them more durable.

  • Anti-Reflective

 

For fashion, comfort and clarity anti-reflective treatments are the way to go. They make the lens nearly invisible, and cut glare from headlights, computer screens and harsh lighting.

Kids Optical

Choosing Eyeglass Frames for Children

According to statistics, approximately one out of five children need to wear glasses to see accurately. Unfortunately, it can be hard to get children to wear glasses for one of several reasons. Children can find glasses uncomfortable, “uncool” and unstylish, or too fragile for an active life.

Fortunately, there are strong, comfortable, stylish frames now made for children. These glasses not only improve vision, but they look great. These are some of the things you should look for when buying eyeglass frames for your child:

It’s all about the right fit

A comfortable, correct fit is essential for children’s glasses. The frames should not be too big or too small, too close to the cheekbone and not higher than the eyebrow. The frames should fit the face well, and not be wider than the face itself.

In general, the smaller the frames the easier it is for a child to forget about them, and not mind wearing them. However, they need to be large enough so that your child can see easily in all directions. An eye specialist needs to help fit the glasses because the middle of the glasses needs to be adjusted to directly correspond to the middle of the pupils of the eye. Even small fitting errors can lead to much less effective vision correction. Parents should resist any urge to buy glasses that are a bit large for their children to grow into.

It’s also very important that the glasses fit properly on the bridge of the nose. Children have small noses and bridges, so the nose support of the glasses needs to fit very well, and be comfortable, with padding. If the glasses sit on pressure points, they will be very uncomfortable, and it’s unlikely your child will wear them. A new feature is gel-padding, that makes the nose bridge extra comfortable. With these features, the glasses will be more comfortable to wear.

Pay attention to the way the frames fit at the temples. They should fit comfortably, without pressure, and without being too loose. Spring hinges are very strong and will ensure the frames have a long lifetime of wear.

Eyeglasses fitted with sport temples are also an option. These temples are flexible and are fitted for a child’s ear.

Materials Frame materials for children’s glasses need to have three properties – be extremely strong, break resistant and light. The ideal frame will be made out of a flexible material that can be bent about without breaking. For this reason, eyeglass frames made of titanium are a good choice, as this material is light and strong. As for the lenses, polycarbonate lenses are more impact-resistant than other lenses and are a good choice for children’s glasses.

Sports Glasses

Sports can be particularly challenging for children who need to wear glasses. Glasses tend to slip and slide with strong movements. Special sports glasses for children are available, that are made entirely out of plastic, with temples that don’t include hinges. These glasses include an elastic strap for the head that helps make sure the glasses stay in place.

Include your child

The most important part of choosing eyeglasses, is choosing them with your child. Include your child in the choice of glasses, among styles that are suitable. If your child likes the way the glasses look and feel, there is a much better chance that your child will actually wear them. When children wear their glasses they are more successful at everything that they do, both casual activities like sports and games, and learning activities at school.

Computer Glasses

Digital devices have impacted our world in so many positive ways, allowing us to connect, work, play, and get information at the speed of light. In fact, many people have a hard time when they “disconnect.” But all of this good brings with it a measure of concern: Digital Eye Strain or Computer Vision Syndrome.

Nearly 70 percent of U.S. adults experience digital eye strain as a result of the growing use of computers and digital devices. Adults aged 18 to 34 report feeling eye strain at a higher rate (45%) than their older counterparts. New research also suggests that overexposure to blue light, also referred to as high-energy visible or HEV light, may contribute to vision problems such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Implications are just now being studied, but the short-term impact of digital eye strain affects individuals on a daily basis. Eye care providers are noting a steady rise in the incidence of myopia as well, which research suggests could be correlated to the increase of screen time and near focusing.

Symptoms of Digital Eye Strain include:

  • Headaches

 

  • Blurred or double vision

 

  • Sore eyes

 

  • Dry or watery eyes

 

  • Sensitivity to light

 

  • Neck, shoulder or back pain

In addition to these symptoms, emerging research shows that blue light from digital devices causes sleep disturbances by interfering with the REM cycle of sleep.

As people move from their computer to their tablet to their phone, more and more of these symptoms are being seen, and in younger and younger people. Computer glasses offer a solution to reduce the strain on your eyes and your exposure to blue light radiation.

How Computer Glasses Work

Computer glasses reduce eye strain by adjusting the focus slightly so that your eyes feel like they are focusing on something further away. They also have a tint to remove the glare and block blue light from entering into your eyes.

Finding the Right Pair

There are a number of companies that make computer glasses, some that are designed for device users without a prescription or that would wear the glasses with contact lenses. Other manufacturers provide options to incorporate vision prescriptions into the lens.

When shopping for computer glasses you want to make sure you find the right pair. The eyewear should sit nicely on your face and provide a comfortable tint. Here are some of the options available:

  • Single Vision Computer Glasses: Provide the optimum lens power and field of view for viewing your computer screen without straining or leaning in to reduce symptoms of CVS. These are ideal for when the computer is at a fixed working distance, and work well if the user needs to view multiple screens at the same working distance.

 

  • Office Lenses or Progressive Lenses: No-line multifocal eyewear that can be made to correct near, intermediate and some distance vision with a larger intermediate zone for computer vision if indicated. Perfect for those with presbyopia which is the gradual loss of focusing ability that occurs naturally with age. Office lenses work like progressive lenses but provide a wider field of view for intermediate (1-3 m) viewing distance and near working distance (about 40 cm).

 

  • Blue-Blocking Lenses: Definitely recommended for this electronic age, blue-blocking lenses block blue light emitted from computer screens that is associated with glare, eye strain and possible sleep disturbances.

 

  • Anti-glare and filtering coatings (treatments): Eliminate reflections from the surfaces of your lens to reduce eye strain and discomfort from glare. Some coatings can also block blue light emitted from

computer screens.

While all of these are good options for protecting your eyes, the 20/20/20 rule still applies – after every 20 minutes of near tasks, look at something beyond 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds…it’s a good time to stretch the rest of the body too.

Eye exams are important to test your focusing ability, and to ensure that both eyes are working and focusing at the same place. Many people do not have the same prescription in each eye.

Children and Computer Glasses

Children are using digital devices more than ever and this trend will only continue as smartphones take over and tablet and computer-based learning increases. Their use extends well beyond the school day , as they use computers for homework and gaming and smartphones to text with their friends.

Computer glasses should be used for children proactively before eye strain begins to keep their eyes healthy longer and prevent nearsightedness.